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Cats + English

  • Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD) is an older term used to describe a set of clinical signs associated with abnormal urination in cats. When the condition has no identifiable cause, it is called Feline Idiopathic Cystitis. This condition was previously called Idiopathic Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (iFLUTD) or Pandora Syndrome.

  • Since we want the best for our pets, we should include them in the go green movement. Here are a few ways you can create a cleaner, greener home for you and your pet.

  • The simple description of an abscess is a “pocket of pus” located somewhere in the body. A cat with an abscess will often have a fever, even if the abscess has ruptured and drained to the outside of the body. Appropriate antibiotic therapy is a critical component of the successful treatment of abscesses, no matter the location.

  • Acepromazine is used as a sedative and a pre-anesthetic agent. It also possesses the following properties: prevents vomiting, prevents muscle spasms, alleviates itching as a result of skin irritation and decreases temperature.

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Paracetamol, APAP, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a pain relief and fever-reducing medicine people use for many types of pain.

  • Acetaminophen is a medication that is used to treat fever and/or pain in humans. Cats have a genetic deficiency in a metabolic pathway in the liver that makes cats vulnerable to acetaminophen toxicity.

  • This medicine may be prescribed to treat glaucoma – a disease of the eye that increases intraocular pressure and produces defects in the field of vision. Acetazolamide will reduce the amount of pressure in the eye.

  • Addison's disease (the common name for hypoadrenocorticism) is caused by a decreased production of two hormones from the adrenal gland. These hormones are cortisol, a stress hormone, and aldosterone, a mineralocorticoid hormone that regulates the body's water balance through its effects on sodium and potassium.

  • These notes are provided to help you understand the diagnosis or possible diagnosis of cancer in your pet. For general information on cancer in pets ask for our handout "What is Cancer". Your veterinarian may suggest certain tests to help confirm or eliminate the diagnosis, and to help assess treatment options and likely outcomes.

  • Endocrine glands produce specialized chemicals called "hormones". These regulate and integrate many activities to maintain internal stability of the body.

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