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Cats + Treatment

  • Cats are nosy creatures, sniffing at anything of interest. Since felines find insects interesting, they sniff at them, and if they stick their nose where it doesn’t belong, they may get a quick reprimand that could be fatal.

  • Although most limps need veterinary attention, there are a few first aid measures you can perform at home if your cat begins to hobble around.

  • Although lowly in position, your cat’s feet occupy a top spot in importance. How can a cat navigate the world without the support of four healthy feet? Healthy foot pads are crucial, so injuries need prompt attention.

  • A gastrostomy tube is a small rubber tube that passes directly into the stomach through the skin and body wall of the cat's abdomen. It permits you to deliver food and water directly into the stomach.

  • Giardiasis is an intestinal infection of man and animals cased by a microscopic protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis. Giardia is a simple one-celled parasitic species; it is not a "worm", bacteria, or virus.

  • Certain medical conditions can be controlled by the use of drugs that are only available in an injectable format. Two of these conditions are diabetes mellitus, which is controlled by daily insulin injections, and certain allergies, which are controlled by regular injections of allergenic extracts.

  • The easiest way to give your cat liquid medication is to mix it in with some canned food. To ensure that your cat swallows all of the medication, it is best to mix it into a small amount of canned food that you feed by hand, rather than mixing it into a full bowl of food that the cat may not completely eat.

  • Giving your cat a pill can be a challenge even for the most experienced veterinarian! The easiest way to give your cat a pill is to hide the pill in food. This usually works best if the pill is hidden in a small amount of tuna, salmon, yogurt or cream cheese.

  • Penetrating trauma typically refers to a deep wound that enters a body cavity such as the abdomen or chest. Most injuries are caused by traumas such as gunshot or arrow wounds, animal fights, impalement on sticks or metal, and automobile accidents. Falls from high places may also result in serious penetrating injuries.

  • A diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) in your cat can feel devastating and even overwhelming. After all, we know that OA is a progressive, degenerative disease that will worsen over time. By most estimates, 90% of cats over age 10 are affected by OA, making it the most common chronic disease they face. Once a cat is diagnosed with OA, it is important to understand that our focus is management rather than cure. Success means maximizing your cat’s comfort and function while minimizing pain.

Location Hours
Monday8:00am – 7:30pm
Tuesday8:00am – 7:30pm
Wednesday8:00am – 7:30pm
Thursday8:00am – 7:30pm
Friday8:00am – 5:00pm
SaturdayClosed
SundayClosed

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