Library

Cats + Tumors

  • The liver has a massive blood supply so many cancer cells from elsewhere arrive within it and start to grow. In dogs, metastatic tumors are three times as common as primary tumors and over 30% of malignant cancer may metastasize to the liver.

  • Most primary lung cancers originate from the epithelium lining the airways. In dogs, most develop in the alveoli where oxygen is taken up into the body, but in people and in cats most originate in the main airways (bronchi).

  • This is a tumor of the lymphatic vessels of the skin or subcutaneous tissue.

  • Lymph is a fluid that circulates in the body, transporting cells of the immune system (macrophages and lymphocytes) to sites where they are needed and draining areas where excess fluid or debris has accumulated, such as occurs with inflammation.

  • This is a tumor originating from cells of the mammary glands. In the cat, most mammary tumors are potentially or already malignant, so early surgical removal is important in preventing spread to other parts of the body (metastasis).

  • Mast cells originate or are formed in the bone marrow but complete their maturation in peripheral tissues. They are found in all tissues of the body but are concentrated in the skin, respiratory tract and digestive tract.

  • Mast cells originate or are formed in the bone marrow but complete their maturation in peripheral tissues. They are found in all tissues of the body but concentrate near surfaces in contact with the external environment such as the skin, respiratory and digestive tracts.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma in situ is a disordered growth of the skin epidermis that may extend to include epithelium of the upper part of the hair follicles.

  • In some cases, chronic inflammation of the nose (rhinitis) leads to proliferation (hyperplasia) and formation of polyps in the nose or throat. These polyps are not cancerous but may need removal.

  • Neuroendocrine cells produce specialized chemical substances called “neuroendocrine hormones”. These hormones affect the rates of specific chemical reactions in nearby cells or in other tissues throughout the body.

Location Hours
Monday8:00am – 7:30pm
Tuesday8:00am – 7:30pm
Wednesday8:00am – 7:30pm
Thursday8:00am – 7:30pm
Friday8:00am – 5:00pm
SaturdayClosed
SundayClosed

I Love SCAH!