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Cats + Diagnosis + English

  • The causes of inappropriate urination include diseases (infections, tumors) affecting the kidneys, bladder and genital tract, endocrine diseases such as diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, Cushing's disease and estrogen responsive urinary incontinence, as well as neurological disease and behavioral problems.

  • Increased appetite is completely normal in pets that have high energy requirements, such as growing puppies and kittens, pets that exercise strenuously such as hunting dogs, and pregnant or nursing females. Also, pets eating a poor quality food may eat more to meet their energy requirements.

  • These clinical signs are non-specific and can be caused by many different diseases or conditions. Usually increased production of dilute urine results in a compensatory increase in water consumption, but occasionally the condition is one of increased water intake resulting in the production of large volumes of dilute urine.

  • Jaundice (also called icterus) is a condition characterized by the accumulation of the bile pigment ‘bilirubin’ in the skin, mucous membranes, and sclera (the whites of the eyes), causing these tissues to become yellow in color.

  • The most common cause of lameness is trauma or injury to joints, ligaments, tendons, muscle or bone.

  • Low blood sugar is a very serious situation, and can have a lot of different causes. Testing blood sugar levels is fairly straightforward, but additional tests may be needed to determine the cause.

  • Pallor means paleness or loss of color. In pets, pallor is usually detected as a loss of color from the gums and inner eyelids. These are normally a light rosy pink, but when pallor develops they become faint pink to white. Pallor is a sign of illness.

  • Seizures typically occur for three main reasons, but finding the cause can be difficult.

  • Sneezing and nasal discharge can appear together or can occur as separate problems. They are associated with disorders of the nasal cavity, nasal sinuses, or both.

  • Most bleeding (or hemorrhage) is caused by trauma. There is usually a wound or a history of injury to explain why a pet is bleeding. Typically, the bleeding stops when a blood clot forms at the site of injury.

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