Preening or Uropygial Gland in Birds

What is a Uropygial gland?preening_gland-1

Among our pet birds, the uropygial gland (preening gland or oil gland) is found on budgies, parrots (except Amazon parrots), canaries, most finches, cockatoos and waterfowl. It is absent in doves, pigeons, Amazon parrots and Hyacinth macaws. It secretes a thick, transparent, complex oil (preening oil) consisting primarily of diester waxes (uropygiols), fats and fatty acids. The gland is located at the base of the tail, on the lower back, just in front of the tail feathers. This area is generally featherless except for a tuft of down at the tip called the uropygial wick. The gland is bilobed, or has two symmetric parts. The oil from each lobe of the gland is secreted through small papilla (nipple-like projection). It performs many functions in the bird including water proofing, and keeping the skin, feathers and bill supple; the oil is said by some to have an antibacterial function. During preening, a bird transfers this oil to its feathers by rubbing its head and beak against the oil gland and then spreading the oil over the feathers on the rest of the body.

"During preening, a bird transfers this oil to its feathers by rubbing its head and beak against the oil gland and then spreading the oil over the feathers on the rest of the body."

The uropygial gland is not normally visible unless the feathers are parted in this area or there is a problem with the gland.

 

What problems can occur with the Uropygial gland?

Vitamin A deficiencies, which occur in birds on poor diets (often high fat, all seed diets), may lead to enlargement of the gland due formation of a plug in the papilla. This is resolved by dislodging the plug and correcting the diet imbalance (especially increasing Vitamin A). Various tumors occur in the uropygial gland and may require surgical correction. Infections may also occur, but these are often secondary to vitamin A deficiency, trauma or immune suppression such as occurs with Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease (PBFD).

If you have any concerns, discuss them with a veterinarian familiar with birds.

This client information sheet is based on material written by: Rick Axelson, DVM

© Copyright 2011 Lifelearn Inc. Used and/or modified with permission under license.

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