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Dogs + Diagnosis

  • One of the most common and useful medical diagnostic procedures is radiography or x-rays. The term x-rays originates from 1895 when the German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen discovered the technique. Since he was unsure what exactly was producing the image on his plates, he titled his paper "On a New Kind of Rays" and the term "x"-rays was substituted for "unknown rays."

  • ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland. The term endogenous simply refers to the ACTH that is produced by the animal itself (as opposed to synthetic ACTH, which is used for diagnostic testing purposes).

  • Serum is the liquid portion of blood. Serum is collected by placing a tube of clotted blood in a machine called a centrifuge, which spins the blood very quickly in a small circle, forcing the cells to the bottom of the tube and allowing the serum to sit on top. There are many substances in serum, including proteins, enzymes, lipids, hormones etc. Testing for these various substances provides information about the organs and tissues in the body as well as the metabolic state of the animal.

  • Electrolytes are the salts and metallic components that are dissolved within the blood serum, and are involved in most of the body's daily functions.

  • Serum iron tests are indicated when the results from a complete blood count (CBC) indicate that your pet is anemic (decreased red blood cell numbers and/or decreased hemoglobin) and that the red blood cells are microcytic (smaller than usual) and hypochromic (contain less hemoglobin than usual).

  • Serum is the liquid portion of blood from which the red blood cells, white blood cells, and factors involved in blood clotting have been removed.

  • Serum is the liquid portion of blood from which the red blood cells, white blood cells, and factors involved in blood clotting have been removed.

  • A biopsy is one of the more common diagnostic procedures performed in dogs. Biopsies provide valuable insight into the type of cells in an abnormal area of skin or a skin growth and whether the growth poses a more serious health threat to your pet. Either the entire mass or a small representative section of skin is removed and submitted to a veterinary pathologist, who will perform a histopathology analysis. The pathologist will attempt to determine the nature of the lesion, identify the type of cells and their relationship to each other, as well as any evidence of malignancy.

  • The causes of abdominal enlargement include an increase in intra-abdominal fat due to simple overall weight gain because of excess calories or insufficient exercise. A redistribution of fat into the abdominal cavity may occur with Cushing's disease.

  • Coughing can have many different causes. The search for answers starts with a complete history and physical examination. Additional diagnostic tests may be needed and your veterinarian may recommend doing screening tests. These are a series of simple tests that provide information about the overall health of the pet and may provide further clues about the underlying problem.

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