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Cats + Tumors + English

  • Cytology is the microscopic examination of cell samples. Cytology can be used to diagnose growths or masses found on the surface of the body, and also to assess bodily fluids, internal organs, and abnormal fluids that may accumulate, especially in the chest and abdomen. Cells can be collected using various methods including fine needle aspiration, skin scraping, impression smear, cotton-tipped swabs, or lavage. A biopsy is the surgical removal of a representative sample of tissue from a suspicious lesion. The most common biopsy techniques are punch biopsy, wedge biopsy, and excision biopsy. The tissue is then processed and is examined under a microscope via histopathology. Histopathology allows the veterinary pathologist to make a diagnosis, classify the tumor, and predict the course of the disease.

  • Tumors of the intestinal epithelial lining include non-cancerous polyps, benign adenomas and malignant epithelial tumors (adenocarcinomas). The polyps and adenomas may be multiple and cause local obstruction.

  • Muscle (called smooth muscle) and fibrous connective tissues form the framework (stroma) that holds other tissues together within the organs of the body. They enable these organs to contract and stretch as part of their function, for example in digestion of food.

  • Ear canal tumors can be benign or malignant. Diagnosis is typically via fine needle aspiration or tissue biopsy. The treatment of choice for ear canal tumors is surgical excision. For benign tumors, complete surgical removal is curative. With malignant tumors, a CT scan is often performed prior to surgery to determine how invasive the tumor is and enable surgical planning. Total ear canal ablation and bulla osteotomy (TECA-BO) is the most common surgical option. Radiation therapy or chemotherapy may be pursued.

  • These are tumors arising from structures within the eye. The most common intraocular tumors originate from the melanin producing cells (discussed in a separate handout).

  • Melanocytes are cells that produce a pigment called melanin. They are found in many parts of the body where there is pigment, particularly the skin, hair and eyes.

  • A 'tumor' is a lump. Some tumors are cancerous and some are benign. There are several different types of tumors that occur in the tissues around the eye. Many of these tumors have physical effects on the eye, causing soreness, redness and weeping. The most common treatment for tumors around the eye is surgical removal of the lump.

  • It is important to recognize that multiple tumors in the liver are not always cancers. The livers of older dogs may become nodular without causing any clinical effects.

  • Most primary lung cancers originate from the epithelium lining the airways. In dogs, most develop in the alveoli where oxygen is taken up into the body, but in people and in cats most originate in the main airways (bronchi).

  • Lymphatic tumors are rare in pets. Lymphangiomas are benign and lymphangiosarcomas are malignant and have a moderate-to-high metastatic potential. Patients with lymphatic tumors typically have severe edema because of lymphatic obstruction. These types of tumors occur more frequently in young dogs and cats. Treatment usually involves surgical excision and chemotherapy may be used as a follow-up treatment in the case of lymphangiosarcomas.

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