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Tumors

  • Common conditions of pet rodents include respiratory diseases, anorexia and lethargy, overgrown teeth, and tumors.

  • Round cell tumors are among the most common skin tumors in dogs, and they typically form just under the skin, although they may change the surface of the skin above them. When caught early, most round cell tumors are removed easily, and surgery is generally curative. The most important take home message is to be vigilant, and to have any skin lumps or bumps assessed by your veterinarian promptly.

  • Salivary cancers are almost invariably malignant tumors originating from the secretory cells of the glands. Other swellings or tumors of salivary glands may be due to infections and cysts.

  • Equine sarcoids are the most common tumors seen and account for approximately nine out of every ten skin tumors seen in horses. They are non-malignant (i.e., they do not spread throughout the body) but do grow larger and often spread and multiply locally.

  • This tumor is a disordered and purposeless overgrowth of sweat gland cells. Most sweat glands are attached to the hair follicles (paratrichial, or beside the hair) but a few are not associated with follicles (atrichial).

  • This is one of many similar tumors that arise by disordered growth of the hair follicles. Almost all of these tumors are benign and can be permanently cured by total surgical removal.

  • This tumor is a disordered and purposeless overgrowth of sebaceous gland cells. These glands are attached to the hair follicles where their function is to lubricate the hairs and skin.

  • Soft tissue sarcomas are a broad category of tumor types. These tumors can arise anywhere there is soft tissue, including the limbs, joints, face, intestine and reproductive tissues. Routine staging is recommended to help dictate therapy. If surgery is possible, wide-surgical excision is pursued. If removal is incomplete or not possible, adjunct radiation therapy can be pursued. Metronomic chemotherapy may provide benefit in patients when few options exist.

  • The spleen is an abdominal organ located near the stomach. The spleen contains two types of tissue, red pulp and white pulp.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a tumor of the cells that make up the contact or upper layer of the skin. UV light exposure has been described as a developmental factor in people and appears to be associated with the development in cats. Areas affected include the ear tips, skin, toes, or peri-ocular region. Fine needle aspiration or biopsy may be performed for diagnosis. The metastatic rate does not appear overly clear, though staging is always recommended. SCC of the toe can occur as a primary tumor or may have spread from the lung (lung-digit syndrome). Surgery is almost always recommended in any case of SCC; the role of chemotherapy is controversial. Radiation therapy has an excellent response rate in cats with the SCC affecting the nasal planum and may give long-term tumor control.

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