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Zoonosis & Human Health + English

  • Tapeworms are flat, segmented intestinal parasites of the cat and dog. The tapeworm uses its hook-like mouthparts for anchoring to the wall of the small intestine. As the adult tapeworm matures, individual segments called proglottids break off from the main body of the tapeworm and pass in the cat's feces. When segments of the tapeworm break off and pass into the cat's stool, they can be seen crawling on the surface of the feces.

  • Tetanus is a bacterial disease that can affect most animals and humans. Horses are particularly susceptible because of their environment and tendency to suffer injuries.

  • Ticks are parasites that feed on the blood of their host and can in turn transmit diseases to your pets or even you. They are prolific breeders and their life cycles can extend through multiple seasons. Prompt removal or use of preventatives limit or prevent the spread of disease, or kill the ticks.

  • Tularemia is an uncommon infection in dogs, but they can be exposed if they kill and/or eat an infected rabbit or rodent.

  • Aquatic turtles such as the red-eared slider have several unique problems. Understanding these problems will allow you to better care for your pet and minimize future health care issues.

  • The Red-eared Slider (Trachemys scripta elegans) is probably the most popular pet aquatic turtle. They are semi-aquatic turtles (they like to leave the water to bask in the sun), native to the warmer southern United States.

  • Turtles have several unique problems. Understanding these problems will allow you to better care for your pet and minimize future health care issues.

  • West Nile Fever is a disease caused by a virus (WNV) carried by mosquitoes. It causes encephalitis (inflammation of the brain and spinal cord) that can affect humans and other animals as well as horses.

  • When a cat bites, its sharp canine teeth easily puncture the skin, leaving small, but deep, wounds in the skin. These punctures rapidly seal over, trapping bacteria from the cat's mouth under the skin of the victim, where they can readily multiply.

  • This handout will review some of the common health concerns that arise for people who have cats as pets. For further information, be sure to ask your veterinary health care provider.

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