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Medications

  • Antibiotic resistant bacterial infections are bacterial infections that are minimally or no longer responsive to commonly used antibiotics. In other words, these bacteria are resistant to antibiotics - they cannot be killed and their growth cannot be stopped. An infection that does not respond appropriately to an antibiotic is suggestive of an antibiotic resistant bacterial infection.

  • The proper administration of eye medication is critical in helping your cat quickly recover from an eye injury or infection. Make sure you have carefully read the drug label and understand the prescription instructions.

  • The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your pet's prompt recovery. Make sure you have carefully read the label and understand the prescription instructions. If you have any questions, contact your veterinarian for clarification.

  • How to properly administer eye medications to your dog.

  • Applying topical medications to your pet can sometimes be a challenge. The information provided in this handout may help make treating your pet easier - for both of you.

  • Our dogs are part of the family. So, it's understandable that we reach for human medications when they feel poorly. Before you share the contents of your medicine cabinet with your dog, here are some tips regarding common over-the-counter medications.

  • Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent used to treat mild to moderate pain, to reduce inflammation and to reduce fever. In veterinary medicine, it is prescribed most commonly to treat blood clots in cats.

  • Atenolol is primarily used to treat heart disease in cats and dogs and to lower blood pressure. It is a beta1-blocking agent. Atenolol decreases the heart's need for blood and oxygen and therefore reduces the amount of work the heart must do. It also helps the heart beat more regularly.

  • Atovaquone (brand name Mepron®) is a drug used to treat infections caused by bacteria and protozoa. It is often combined with other drugs to treat specific infections. Side effects from atovaquone have not been reported; however, any side effects that you observe should be reported to your veterinarian. Any side effects that you observe should be reported to your veterinarian.

  • Atropine sulfate is used in the eye to dilate the pupil. It may also be used to control pain in the eye due to corneal and uveal disease and in treating secondary glaucoma.

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